Tag Archives: water damage repair Maine

Building Water Leaks

Moisture is often a silent building wrecker. An insignificant slow drip can cause a substantial amount of damage.
REALTORS® and www.houselogic.com publish a very handy list for maintenance as it relates to water leaks and intrusions-

1.  When it rains, actively pay attention. Are your gutters overflowing? Is water flowing away from your house like it should? Is water coming inside?

2.  After heavy rains and storms, do a quick inspection of your roof, siding, foundation, windows, doors, ceilings, and basement to spot any damage or leaks.

3.  Use daylight savings days or the spring and fall equinox to remind you to check and test water-related appliances like your washer, refrigerator, water heater, HVAC (condensation in your HVAC can cause leaks) or swamp cooler, and sump pump. It’s also a great time to do regular maintenance on them. Inspect any outdoor spigots and watering systems for leaks, too.

4.  Repair any damage and address any issues and leaks ASAP.

“Don’t procrastinate when you spot minor leaks or drips inside your house. Ongoing small leaks can slowly erode pipes and fixtures, and even cause mold and mildew issues you won’t notice until it’s too late.

Say you’ve got a bit of cracked caulk around the kitchen window. It may not seem like much, but behind that caulk, water could get into your sheathing, causing mold damage and rot. Before you know it, you’re looking at a $5,000 repair that could have been prevented by a $4 tube of caulk and a half hour of your time.”

Fall Maintenance

Commercial and residential buildings will benefit from early maintenance before cold weather arrives.

  1. Clean gutters and downspouts.
  2. Reseal exterior woodwork- fences, pergolas, sheds, and trellises should be inspected and included in the process.
  3. Check for pest infestation and associated damage- small animals, e.g. mice and squirrels, as well as insects ants, termites, and wasps can present problems and cause damage.
  4. Roof inspection/repair will protect the building from heavy snow loads and ice dams.
  5. Chimney inspection, as well as window and skylight inspection will help prevent leaks and water damage.
  6. Attics and basements shouldn’t be overlooked, particular attention should be paid to attic insulation.
  7. Wood stoves and heaters should be inspected for necessary repairs/replacement.
  8. HVAC and heating systems will benefit from service and filter changes.
  9. Windows and doors should be inspected for replacement and repairs.
  10. Landscaping, particularly trees and shrubs, will survive winter better protected before harsh weather arrives.

Spring Maintenance Checklist

Commercial and residential buildings will benefit from early maintenance before summer weather arrives.

  1. Clean gutters and downspouts to be sure water flows freely away from building foundations.
  2. Reseal exterior woodwork- fences, pergolas, sheds, and trellises should be inspected and included in the process.
  3. Check for pest infestation and associated damage- small animals, e.g. mice and squirrels, as well as insects ants, termites, and wasps can present problems and cause damage.
  4. Roof inspection/repair and exterior painting will help to preserve building envelope integrity.
  5. Chimney inspection, as well as window and skylight inspection will help prevent leaks and water damage.
  6. Attics and basements shouldn’t be overlooked, particular attention should be paid to sump pumps and roof ventilation. Mold growth will flourish with elevated moisture.
  7. Sprinkler and irrigation systems should be inspected for necessary repairs/replacement.
  8. Dehumidifiers and AC systems will benefit from service and filter changes.
  9. Window and door screens should be inspected for replacement and repairs.
  10. Retaining walls, walks, and driveways may have been damaged through the winter months.
  11. Landscaping, particularly trees and shrubs, may require attention after harsh winter conditions.

Preparing for Cold Weather

Temperatures are dropping and systems maintenance is fundamental in efficient operation. Seasonal properties should be winterized to prevent pipe breaks and winter water damage. Occupied properties will benefit from routine maintenance, filter changes as well as an examination of ducts, vents, and connections should be included. ENERGY.GOV offers tips on heat pump maintenanceBuilding Green also lists suggestions for winter heat pump operation.

Prevent Water Damage & Mold Growth

Routine maintenance inspections are the single most crucial element in preventing water damage and mold growth.
  • Look for condensation and wet spots from the attic to the basement.
  • Maintain living areas; clean kitchens and bathrooms regularly, do not allow unused organic materials to accumulate and dispose of refuse in a timely manner.
  • Leave a 2-3″ space between furniture and walls allowing air to circulate freely.
  • Repair plumbing leaks and other building leaks as soon as possible.
  • Prevent moisture condensation by reducing the moisture level in the air and increasing air circulation.
  • Keep HVAC (heating, ventilating and air-conditioning) drip pans clean, flowing properly, and unobstructed; change filters regularly.
  • Vent moisture generating appliances (e.g., clothes dryers) to the building exterior (i.e., outside) when possible.
  • Be sure to check water hoses on appliances e.g. dishwashers, washing machines, refrigerators/ice cube makers, as well as reviewing hot water heaters for wear and deterioration on a quarterly basis.
  • Vent kitchens and bathrooms to code requirements.
  • Leave the bathroom door open and run the exhaust fan for a few minutes after showering/bathing.
  • Provide adequate drainage around buildings and slope ground away from building foundations; follow local code requirements.
  • Clean gutters and downspouts; add downspout extensions to divert water away from building foundation if necessary.
  • Be sure there is at least 2′ between buildings and landscaping; the gap will allow air to circulate and prevent moisture accumulation.
  • Remove snow from roofs to prevent structural damage/ice dams and to keep ridge vents and DWV pipes working effectively.
  • Identify areas where leaks have occurred, correct the causes and take preventative action to ensure leaks do not recur.
  • Never leave buildings while appliances are running unattended.

 

Criterion Theater Bar Harbor

The Criterion Theater in Bar Harbor will reopen Friday, May 1st. We were very pleased to be part of the restoration project. Rob Levin of The MDI Islander had a piece about the Criterion in this week’s edition- “We’re just so excited to get people in the building, other than the workers and us,” Jazz Festival President Michael Boland said Tuesday. Renovations began in November 2014 after the festival group received an anonymous $2 million donation to buy the building and begin fixing it up. The first step was to bring in Eastern Mold Remediation to undo years of water, mildew and mold damage. During a recent tour, it appeared those efforts have been a resounding success. The inside air is fresh and clean, without a hint of the moldy odors that plagued the building for years. A number of other projects have been underway since, and just about all of them will be done by opening night. The theater’s carpets were torn out and replicas made from the original 1930s print reinstalled. The white and black tiles out front have been replaced with red and black tiles, which Boland said are more historically accurate.